Mistborn’s study of religion seems to reflect Sanderson’s exploration of his own faith

The Mistborn series was Brandon Sanderson’s biggest hit… (before the Stormlight Archives blew it out of the water.)

But the series is still very good, and showed off Sanderson’s ability to create a beautiful world, fun dialogue, and an interesting magic system. Most brilliantly, it showed off Sanderson’s ability to create a crazy story arc that unwraps into a huge, sprawling plot and wraps itself back up again with a tiny bow on top.

That being said, the most interesting thing to me in Mistborn (and Sanderson) is around Religion.

Mistborn and Sanderson and Religion

Sanderson is a Mormon, which gives light to some patterns in his writing. You can see him teasing the edge of normal adult themes but the books stay mostly PG. His action is brilliant, but his conversations around romance and relationships have a child-like innocence.

The man seems to have a constant, intellectual struggle with his own relationship with the LDS (Latter Day Saints), and is open about it in his blog post reflecting on JK Rowling’s revelation of Dumbledore’s sexuality. This blog post is so, so characteristic of his open-minded writing style, and makes me appreciate that his character and his books are cut from the same cloth.

How much of his struggles are in the mind of Sazed? How does he think about featuring socially liberal characters and undergoing an study of hundreds of theoretical religions?

“It sounds to me, young one,” Haddek said, “that you’re searching for something that cannot be found.” “The truth?” Sazed said. “No,” Haddek replied. “A religion that requires no faith of its believers.”

I can’t help but wonder if Sazed’s intellectual, dispassionate study of religions around the world parallel’s Sanderson’s own attempt to question but come to terms with the Mormon Church.

How had Sazed become the one that people came to with their problems? Couldn’t they sense that he was simply a hypocrite, capable of formulating answers that sounded good, yet incapable of following his own advice? He felt lost. He felt a weight, squeezing him, telling him to simply give up.

In general, the entire series toys with the idea and roles religion and prophecy play in our lives. The idea of religious idols getting twisted and transformed by its practitioners is a consistent theme across the three books. Whether it be the Lord Ruler, the Survivor, the Survivor of the Flames, or the capital B big religion, they all come with their illusion of legitimacy, flaws, and fights between those of the faith.

I think Sanderson is the best fantasy author of this decade, and the way he approaches faith in his books simply makes me respect him even more.

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